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Why children need their fathers

Although mothers are given primary custody of their children in many cases of parental separation, the role of fathers is still essential. Children need emotional love and support from both parents in order to properly develop. If you have recently separated or filed for divorce, it is crucial to keep in mind the importance of a father in a child’s life.

Studies conducted by the Father Involvement Research Alliance shows that from birth, babies who have active and involved fathers are more confident in new situations, are emotionally secure and are able to explore their surroundings. Children with involved fathers are 43 percent more likely to do better in school and have less behavioral problems and depression.

Kids who have consistent contact with their fathers have an overall higher self-esteem than those who do not see their dads on a regular basis. Boys often show less impulsivity and less aggression and girls have a more positive view of males. These qualities lead to more successful careers, better marriages, and the development of supportive social networks as adults.

A dad’s involvement differs from that of a mothers’, as dads are more physically interactive with children. Dads’ encourage children to take risks and give them a firm security that they will be safe if anything should happen. Fathers’, in many cases, are better disciplinarians and have a different approach to teaching children right and wrong. Kids who have both of these examples in their life are more likely to be well-rounded and contributing members of society.

This information is intended to educate and should not be taken as legal advice. 

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