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Child Support Archives

When your child’s other parent falls behind on child support

As a Minnesota single parent, day-to-day life can prove difficult in and of itself, but if you are expecting financial help from your child’s other parent and that person fails to deliver, it can be even more emotionally taxing. At Huson Law Firm, PLLC, we recognize that there are certain legal measures you may be able to take when you find yourself in this situation, and that the parent failing to pay support can wind up in serious trouble for neglecting to do so.

More moms paying child support

If you and your spouse in Minnesota are discussing a separation or a divorce and you have minor children together, you know that you will somehow have to figure out how to raise your kids together while no longer being married. One component to raising kids is paying for them and their associated needs. This may mean that one of you will be required to make child support payments.

What does child support cover?

If a Minnesota court ordered you to pay child support, you may wonder, like many other payees, what, exactly, child support covers. You may also assume that child support only covers the essentials such as food, clothing and shelter. Unfortunately, you would assume wrong.

How can I organize my child’s medical bills?

Divorced Minnesota parents can create provisions in their divorce agreements that state which of the two parents are to pay for medical bills for their children, if one parent or both should do it, and how much each parent is to pay. However, there are times when a parent is slow to pay his or her share. When this happens, you need to take important steps to organize medical bills and receipts that you will need when you seek reimbursement for your child’s medical bills.

Tracking your expenses can help with child support issues

Making purchases is a common part of everyday life, so common that it is easy to forget about when, where or even what we have purchased from day to day. However, for Minnesota parents who receive or pay child support, keeping a record of purchases may take on greater importance. Fatherly explains that documenting and tracking your expenses could be crucial if you ever have to renegotiate child support, among other matters.

What child support changes occurred in 2018?

If you pay child support, it is important to stay on top of the different things happening with the system in Minnesota. According to WDIO, the child support guidelines changed in 2018. These changes may affect how much you have to pay in child support, but you will only know if your case is affected if you petition the court to revise your order. Even though the changes went into effect on August 1, 2018, they were not automatically applied to existing child support orders.

Does delinquent child support harm your credit?

Many people understand that a failure to pay child support runs the risk of wage garnishments, seizures of tax refunds, or even property liens to pay off the outstanding support. However, delinquent child support can harm your long term financial future in other ways. In fact, failing to pay Minnesota child support can be noted on your credit report and inflict great damage to your credit score.

How do you get a driver's license back from child support courts?

If you were to receive a notice that the court was suspending your license due to an arrearage on your child support payments, then your first reaction might be panic. However, the situation might not be as dire as it seems at first. Minnesota law could provide a way to delay or prevent the suspension of your license and the placement of a lien on the equity you hold in your vehicle. 

Calculating child support in a Minnesota divorce

When parents choose to file for divorce in Minnesota, they must attend to a host of issues regarding the children involved in the marriage. One of the most important may be that of child custody and child support. States may adopt different models of calculating child support based on the parents’ income, time spent with the child and several other factors. Minnesota uses an income shares model of calculating child support, according to the National Conference of State Legislators. This is built off the belief that children should have the same financial support that they would have had if their parents would have stayed married.

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