A Better Approach To Family Law

Parenting time can be complex with chaotic schedules

On Behalf of | Oct 11, 2021 | Child Custody

When getting divorced and trying to figure out how to divide parenting time, most parents are thinking about their own schedules. They have to work, the kids have to go to school, and they need a schedule that fits with their life. This balance can be difficult.

It only gets more complex when your child also has a chaotic schedule. Say that you have a 12-year-old son who plays hockey. He has practice every day after school. He has games every weekend. Many of the games are in other cities or other states. It feels like you’re constantly traveling.

This can make it hard to set up a “normal” custody schedule. It may not be realistic for one parent to see the child on the weekend instead of during the week, for example, because then the other parent would miss all of the games. Trading custody from week to week can also be hard because both parents have to figure out a way to make all of those practices and games fit their own schedule. What can you do?

Be flexible and design a custom plan

First off, remember that your custody plan doesn’t have to be normal at all. You can create a unique plan addressing exactly what your family needs. Do not be afraid to get creative with it. Work with your ex to do this.

Secondly, you need to be flexible. It may not be ideal, but be willing to adjust your timeframe when necessary. If it’s easier to do something a bit differently one week than the next, be open to that. It makes it harder when you demand a rigid schedule that just is not realistic.

Finally, always put your child first. Remember that the plan is about them and their happiness, not about you and not about your ex. If the two of you are able to put your own differences aside and focus on your child, it makes everything easier.

Creating your plan

Granted, creating this plan can still be complicated. You must know what steps to take to get everything set up in a way that really works for your post-divorce family.

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